Active Fire Protection Systems

Enterprise Security Magazine

Passive fire protection applies to the use of building components such as firewalls, floors, and ceilings to control the spread of fire for a set period. To decrease the size of a fire, they partition a building into compartments.

FREMONT, CA: Fire safety systems have come a long way. Automatic water sprinklers have been around for at least 150 years, along with fire extinguishers in every building and car (or should), procedures, and fire barriers within buildings. However, because fire safety is such a critical issue, new technologies are continually being developed to prevent the loss of life and property and activity disruption.

Fire protection can be divided into two categories: passive fire protection and active fire protection. Passive fire protection applies to the use of building components such as firewalls, floors, and ceilings to control the spread of fire for a set period. To decrease the size of a fire, they partition a building into compartments. However, the article focuses on active fire protection systems, which directly limit the spread of fire and smoke while not alarming more people than necessary about an issue. Smoke detectors, sprinkler systems, and fire alarms are probably all things one is already familiar with.

Water Mist Suppression

Water mist systems disperse water in considerably smaller droplets, reducing the amount of water required while simultaneously increasing the area covered. They lower the total temperature faster because they produce steam, which substitutes oxygen, the primary fuel for the fire. It also forms a water barrier on surfaces, slowing the spread of fire.

Air Sampling Smoke Detectors

These systems are always working to provide the earliest possible notification of a fire hazard. They can detect a fire before it spreads and suppresses it while it is still small. They use piping or tubing to draw in air through sample ports actively. The detector then looks for smoke in the air. These detectors can draw air in from several areas within a structure and, as a result, are continually on the lookout for fire, ready to respond as soon as it occurs.

Predictive Analysis and Big Data

One can improve their risk analyses by evaluating enormous amounts of data. Big data studies are now being examined to see if they may provide exact forecasts regarding future events. If this is the case, such estimates might be utilized to optimize site layout to reduce the time it takes to deliver emergency help and, as a result, the number of fire victims. Fire statistics, geographic information systems, building data, weather, sensors in the building, fire service deployment statistics, location analysis, and demographic statistics would all be used to make predictions for preventive fire protection.

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